Posts Tagged ‘Analysis’

Kevin Fowler — Penny For Your Thoughts

May 25, 2009

The third song on Kevin Fowler’s album Beer, Bait and Ammo is Penny for Your Thoughts, a more serious song that talks about the very real problem of the role of money in modern day relationships and the stereotype that love requires money and vice versa.  There isn’t any real set rhyme scheme with this song, at most its slant rhyme.

Some folks put a price on everything
Cause nothin’ in life comes for free
Well love don’t cost money, just hard work and time
You’ve got to give if you want to receive

This first verse outlines the overall problem. Namely, that supposedly nothing is free in life, except love.  Kind of the same concept as the Beatle’s song Can’t Buy Me Love without the carefree attitude towards the money that can’t get what the singer wants.  It also shows a bit of parallelism between how money works and how love works, giving in order to receive.

I’d give a penny for your thoughts
The world for one kiss
Give my life for your love
Give it all for one wish
I would buy you the moon
And the stars up above
I could you buy most anything
But I can’t buy your love

I take back what I said earlier about the singer lacking the carefree attitude towards money that the singer in Can’t Buy Me Love, because the singer is willing to give up everything so that the woman he loves will love him, but the tone of the display of his wishes is more desperate than cheerful as the Beatle’s song was.  As the singer goes through the chorus it shows progression from smaller things to larger things and what he’d give to have the woman’s love.  The end of the chorus is also the only place in the song where we see actual rhyme.  This compared to his other songs that I’ve looked at so far has the least amount of rhyming in it.

When it comes to love and money
It seems the two go hand in hand
At least that’s what they say
About love these days
I just don’t understand
Yes I’d be a heathen if I were to believe
She could love me for who I am
I’d give it all away just to hear her say
I love my poor man

In this verse he bemoans the purported relationship between love and money that everyone says is true and says, “I guess I’m a heathen then, because I don’t believe it.” and declares that he would give it all away if she would say that she loved him though he was poor.  Speaking of ‘poor’  he uses it in a clever way as a pun instead of the normal ‘you poor, poor man.’  sense.

I would buy you the moon
And the stars up above
I could you buy most anything
But I can’t buy your love

Here he repeats the last four lines of the chorus to close out the song and give it a feel of completion and kind of leaves the audience with the implication that he did not win the love of the one he loved.

This is one of my favorite songs of his, because it talks about something really relevant.  Most people can relate to this sort of song, because just about everyone has money issues and in this age where commercials all say that money can buy happiness and improve your love life with all the things you can buy with it, people struggle with what is and isn’t appropriate to do to show one’s love for their loved one.  While the song is pretty plain in its words, not using too many poetic devices, it gets its point across and in my opinion is a great down-to-earth song.

The third song on Kevin Fowler’s album Beer, Bait and Ammo is Penny for Your Thoughts, a more serious song that talks about the very real problem of the role of money in modern day relationships and the stereotype that love requires money and vice versa.  There isn’t any real set rhyme scheme with this song, at most its slant rhyme.

Some folks put a price on everything
Cause nothin’ in life comes for free
Well love don’t cost money, just hard work and time
You’ve got to give if you want to receive

This first verse outlines the overall problem. Namely, that supposedly nothing is free in life, except love.  Kind of the same concept as the Beatle’s song Can’t Buy Me Love without the carefree attitude towards the money that can’t get what the singer wants.  It also shows a bit of parallelism between how money works and how love works, giving in order to receive.

I’d give a penny for your thoughts
The world for one kiss
Give my life for your love
Give it all for one wish
I would buy you the moon
And the stars up above
I could you buy most anything
But I can’t buy your love

I take back what I said earlier about the singer lacking the carefree attitude towards money that the singer in Can’t Buy Me Love, because the singer is willing to give up everything so that the woman he loves will love him, but the tone of the display of his wishes is more desperate than cheerful as the Beatle’s song was.  As the singer goes through the chorus it shows progression from smaller things to larger things and what he’d give to have the woman’s love.  The end of the chorus is also the only place in the song where we see actual rhyme.  This compared to his other songs that I’ve looked at so far has the least amount of rhyming in it.

When it comes to love and money
It seems the two go hand in hand
At least that’s what they say
About love these days
I just don’t understand
Yes I’d be a heathen if I were to believe
She could love me for who I am
I’d give it all away just to hear her say
I love my poor man

In this verse he bemoans the purported relationship between love and money that everyone says is true and says, “I guess I’m a heathen then, because I don’t believe it.” and declares that he would give it all away if she would say that she loved him though he was poor.  Speaking of ‘poor’  he uses it in a clever way as a pun instead of the normal ‘you poor, poor man.’  sense.

I would buy you the moon
And the stars up above
I could you buy most anything
But I can’t buy your love

Here he repeats the last four lines of the chorus to close out the song and give it a feel of completion and kind of leaves the audience with the implication that he did not win the love of the one he loved.

This is one of my favorite songs of his, because it talks about something really relevant.  Most people can relate to this sort of song, because just about everyone has money issues and in this age where commercials all say that money can buy happiness and improve your love life with all the things you can buy with it, people struggle with what is and isn’t appropriate to do to show one’s love for their loved one.  While the song is pretty plain in its words, not using too many poetic devices, it gets its point across and in my opinion is a great down-to-earth song.